Summer Book Reviews

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When summer break began, I had a couple books in mind at that I wanted to read, but seeing as I don’t really like to read (I know, I’m an English teacher, it’s weird.), I wasn’t too sure how far I’d get.

Well, I amazed myself and read a couple more than I had originally intended.

I really want to dedicate more time to reading, but my motivation is low.  Even with the most exciting of books, I seem to end up falling asleep!  I can’t help it!  Really, I can’t, I totally blame my astigmatism.

Though, since I’m coming off of the high of surpassing the goals of my summer reading list, I have high hopes that I’ll keep up this pace for the school year.

Anyway,  here’s a compilation of what I’ve read and my mini-review on each selection. All books are linked to Amazon, so if you’re intrigued by a title and want to see what other people think about the book too, click and follow the link to the Amazon reviews!

1. The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom and John and Elizabeth Sherrill

 I set out to make this my first read of the summer because 1. I had a few copies laying around at school and 2. several of my students had read it during the past school year and they really seemed to enjoy and be inspired by it.  I knew I would like The Hiding Place because it falls into the non-fiction category, which I can’t seem to get enough of lately, but I really was uplifted by the story and all of the “coincidences” that happened throughout.  Corrie’s faith pulls her through the Holocaust, and her complete reliance on God provoked me to consider how I would think and act if I were in her situation.  I have read various stories on this topic, but Corrie’s view was different for me because it began as a comfortable story about her family and slowly spiraled into chaotic, war-torn scenarios.  The way the novel unfolded was relatable and made it seem like a situation in which anyone could find himself.

 

2.  This is a Book by Demetri Martin

 

This little gem caught my eye at the library, so I just had to snatch it up.  Demetri has been a favorite comedian of mine for a long time, so I will pretty much read anything he writes.  This is a book; however, it is written as if you are at a comedy show…kind of?  That’s the best way I can describe it.  Jokes, scripts, charts, and drawings fill the pages and they will keep you laughing, chuckling, smirking, and wondering.  One reason I have always been drawn to Demetri is because of his quirky, WAY-outside-the-box thinking.  That being said, this book probably isn’t for everyone, but if I’ve ever made you laugh, then it’s possible that you might laugh at this book too.

 

 

 

 

3.  Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand

This is another book that I put on my list because of my students.  I heard great things about this true story over the year so I had to check it out myself.  Unbroken is the story of Louis Zamperini and his incredible life.  This guy was an Olympic distance runner, survived a plane crash as well as being stranded in the ocean for 47 days, and he endured ridiculous levels of torture at various Japanese POW camps.  I couldn’t believe the events that Louis lived to talk about, and I found it really cool that he also realized that he couldn’t have gotten through any of them without the help of the Lord.  I haven’t decided if I want to see the film version of his story or not… I’m betting (like usual) the book tells it best!

 

4.  I Want My Epidural Back by Karen Alpert

Eeeek!  Mrs. Alpert has quite the potty mouth!  But, if you can get past that, this book is pretty entertaining.  Karen definitely “goes there” and writes about the things that moms try to keep to themselves because they are too taboo.  As much as I love reading about the “right” way to parent, and researched procedures about how to deal with your child in every situation possible, and the optimal diet for your little one at every age and stage—-sometimes my brain needs a break.  I Want My Epidural Back gave me that breathing room I so needed and helped ensure that there is no right way in the momming world; we’re all just doing the best we can.  Might as well laugh about it along the way!

 

5.  Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

This was my favorite read this summer.  The story is about Chris McCandless, a young man who attempted to journey into Alaskan wilderness but is found dead just a short while later.  Jon Krakauer puts the pieces of this real-life scenario together by talking to friends and acquaintances of Chris, and adding his own investigation and research to provide the answers to all the questions surrounding Chris’ death.  I found the story line intriguing right off the bat, and once I got into the book, I couldn’t get enough.  Just. Read. It.

 

6.  Frida Kahlo by Gerry Souter

If you like a lot of pictures, and not a lot of words, this book is for you! 😉 Frida’s paintings are displayed across from a paragraph or two of text on each page spread.  Initially when I got this book I had hoped that the text would give background information on the corresponding painting, but it does not.  The text tells an abbreviated biography of Frida Kahlo and occasionally refers to the images included in the book.  This was a quick read, and I learned a couple details about her life that I did not previously know.

 

7.  The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

This is my current read, I’m about 1/3 of the way through, and so far, so good.  This is another true story (see a pattern here?) about the construction of the World’s Fair held in Chicago in 1893.  The book is split between the story of the fair’s production including architectural design and details, but then switches to a story line about serial killer who was also working quite tirelessly during the fair’s construction.  I look forward to reading the rest.

 

 

I’ve got a few books lined up for the fall, but I’m open to suggestions!  Drop any you have in a comment below!